The Deceptively Simple Slip Stitch

Now that fall is fast approaching, I thought it would be nice to help you get into gear on some early autumn knitting with a fabulous selection of coats from the September issue of Creative Knitting magazine.

When it comes to knitting a coat, the decision to make one is quite different than making a pullover or a smaller knitted piece. Why? The reason is because:

  1. It takes a lot more time and energy.
  2. It involves a bigger monetary investment.
  3. There are potential fears about confusion with the pattern and if help will be available if needed.

I can totally understand your concerns because I’ve had many of them myself. How horrifying it would be to spend your hard-earned money and time only to find yourself stumped on the directions in the pattern!

To help ease your fears, I’d like to walk you through a short Slip Stitch 101 for the White Mountain Kimono Coat, featured in the September issue. This striking design is made with Rowan Cocoon, with two strands held together to provide extra warmth. This piece features a deceptively simple slip stitch pattern that is easy to work once you get the hang of it. In this handy tutorial, you’ll learn that it’s OK to slip and drop your stitches. In fact, it can be quite liberating. So, let’s get started!

White Mountain Kimono Coat by Daniella Nii, Creative Knitting, September 2011.

White Mountain Kimono Coat by Daniella Nii, Creative Knitting, September 2011.

 
Making Sense of the Slipped Stitch

Over the first 5 rows of this pattern, you’ll be working a series of slipped stitches. You’ll notice that you slip your stitches with the yarn in back (wyib) when you’re working on the right side, and you slip your stitches with the yarn in front (wyif) on the wrong side. When you slip a stitch, in essence this is an unworked stitch, which inevitably results in a dramatic, elongated look as you’ll begin to see clearly when you work Row 6 below.

*Note: You may want to practice this pattern stitch on a small swatch before you jump into working the full coat pattern.

(multiple of 8 sts + 2)

Row 1 (WS): K2, *p6, k2; rep from * across.

Row 2 (RS): P2, *sl 1 pwise wyib, k4, sl 1 pwise wyib, p2; rep from * across.

Row 3: K2, *sl 1 pwise wyif, p4, sl 1 pwise wyif, k2; rep from * across.

Rows 4 and 5: Rep Rows 2 and 3.

 *Note: This row is worked in off-white so you can see exactly what happens with the slipped stitches.

Row 6: P2, *drop sl st off LH needle to front of work, k2, pick up sl st with LH needle and knit it. (taking care not to twist st)

Loop dropped off needle.

Drop slipped stitch off left-hand needle to front of work, knit 2 stitches.

Pick up slipped stitch with left-hand needle and knit it.

Pick up slipped stitch with left-hand needle and knit it.

Resulting slipped stitch, slanting to the left.

Resulting slipped stitch, slanting to the left.

Slip next 2 sts to RH needle, drop next sl st off LH needle to front of work, slip the 2 sts back to LH needle, pick up dropped st with LH needle

Slip the 2 stitches back to the left-hand needle, pick up the dropped stitch with left-hand needle.

Slip the 2 stitches back to the left-hand needle, pick up the dropped stitch with left-hand needle.

and k3, p2; rep from * across.

Resulting slipped stitches. (in white)

Resulting slipped stitches. (in white)

Rep Rows 1–6 for pat.

For a list of abbreviations, see page 95 in the September issue of Creative Knitting magazine.

I hope you found this tutorial useful and that this instruction has hopefully given you more confidence on a new way to integrate slipped stitches into your knitted creations.

One Response to The Deceptively Simple Slip Stitch

  1. I find a good number of high quality lessons in your tutorials. Great job in keeping your ideas and thoughts organized. A lot of effort and patience you’ve spent in providing us with such a great tutorial.

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